Utah’s richest man, Tech CEO Jeff T. Green, who is worth $ 4.6 billion, cuts ties with the Mormon Church

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Utah’s richest man has officially denounced Latter-day Saint Church of Jesus Christ for “obstruction of civil rights” and pledged to give away at least 90 percent of its nearly $ 5 billion wealth in advertising technology.

Tech CEO Jeff T. Green sent a 900-word letter to Mormon Church President Russell Nelson on Monday demonizing the organization as a wealth shorthand that harms people around the world.

‘[While most members] are good people trying to do the right thing, I believe the church is active and is currently causing harm in the world. Church leaders are not honest about their history, finances and advocacy, “he wrote, adding,” I believe the Mormon Church has hindered global progress on women’s, civil and racial equality, and LGBTQ + rights. ”

Green, 44, a graduate of Brigham Young University and a former Mormon missionary, was helped by eleven family members and a friend in his resignation from the Utah-based faith.

The divorced father of three also announced that his family’s foundation will make its first major donation of $ 600,000 to Equality Utah, an organization that helps members of the LGBTQ + community.

According to the Salt Lake Tribune, Green said that “nearly half of the funds for a new scholarship program will be used to help LGBTQ + students in Utah,” especially those who “may have to leave or want to leave BYU.”

Pictured: President of the Mormon Church Russell Nelson

Tech CEO Jeff T. Green (left) sent a 900-word letter to Mormon Church President Russell Nelson (right) on Monday describing the organization as a wealth shorter that harms people around the world

The CEO and chairman of Trade Desk, currently based in Southern California, claims he left the Mormon Church informally “more than a decade ago,” and his December 20 letter to Nelson serves as a formal notice of separation.

“Although I love many Mormons very much and am grateful for many of the things that Mormonism has brought into my life, I have not considered myself a member for many years, and I want to make it clear to you and others that I am not. “A member,” wrote Green.

“Although I left the Mormon Church more than a decade ago – without believing, attending or practicing – I have not yet officially requested the removal of my records.”

The billionaire also accused the church of taking advantage of its often poor members to achieve its own goals.

“I think the Church has taken advantage of its members and their need for hope to build temples, build malls and ranches, fund Ensign Peak Advisors mutual funds, and own mortgage-backed securities instead of alleviating human suffering in and out of town . “Church,“ he said and asked for the Church spends its “more than $ 100 billion in assets” to “do more to help the world and its members.”

“This money comes from people who are often poor and who wholeheartedly believe that they represent the will of Jesus. They give and await the blessings of heaven. ‘

The billionaire accused the Church of financially exploiting its members, who are often poor, to achieve its own goals (Image: The LDS Salt Lake Temple, Utah)

The billionaire accused the Church of financially exploiting its members, who are often poor, to achieve its own goals (Image: The LDS Salt Lake Temple, Utah)

Green reiterated that his decision to disconnect from LDS was final and that “the only contact I would like the Church to have is a single letter of confirmation to let me know that I am no longer listed as a member. ”

Meanwhile, he said he hopes to continue working with organizations including Equality Utah and use his own financial blessings to improve the community.

“It is my and my Foundation’s hope that this will be the first of many contributions to Equality Utah,” said Green, adding, “We have made this large and public investment to send a message that Equality Utah is nowhere going . “

While Green accuses the church of interfering with LGBTQ + rights, LDS and Equality Utah actually served as partners to drive the adoption of the so-called Utah Compromise – a non-discrimination law that protects the queer community from employment and housing discrimination.

When the law passed in February, Church Spokesman Doug Andersen made a statement to FOX 13 supporting the law and protecting freedom of religion.

“Both are possible and clearly necessary in a just society,” wrote Andersen earlier this year.

Trade Desk CEO Jeff Green (pictured) also pledged to give away at least 90 percent of his estimated $ 5 billion in advertising technology fortune

Trade Desk CEO Jeff Green (pictured) also pledged to give away at least 90 percent of his estimated $ 5 billion in advertising technology fortune

Despite their supposed efforts to benefit all people, including the LGBTQ + community, Green and his family believe the church has done more harm than good.

Jennifer Gaerte, Green’s sister, told the newspaper she had the “perfect Mormon family” until the death of a family member forced her “into survival mode.”

She said that other parishioners shunned her after her grief-stricken husband decided not to go to church and other Mormon children threw stones at their children.

Gaerte also claims the Church refused to fire her from a LDS youth organization called Young Women, and said that if he fired her she would become an inactive member of the Church.

In response, she said to the church leader, “If you don’t release me, I will release myself.”

One of Green’s cousins, Doug Whittemore, said that while he had a wonderful upbringing, something didn’t intuitively work for me.

“It was pragmatic, but I could never get into that [religious] The concepts and the teachings were as far-fetched as you might think, ”he shared.

The divorced father of three said his family's foundation will make its first major donation of $ 600,000 to Equality Utah, an organization that helps members of the LGBTQ + community

The divorced father of three said his family’s foundation will make its first major donation of $ 600,000 to Equality Utah, an organization that helps members of the LGBTQ + community

Whittemore also claimed he was isolated from other churchgoers after choosing not to serve a mission aimed at attracting new members to the Church.

“Many haven’t spoken to me in years,” he said. ‘And it has stayed that way to this day.’

Repeating his cousin’s claims, Green said, “The most positive part of our childhood wasn’t the strong connection we had with our parents but with the community. I am deeply grateful to this community and its great people, including my ancestors who made great sacrifices in the name of God and the community. ‘

Despite this positive attitude, however, Green remains firm in his decision to part ways, arguing that he is no longer a believer.

“Believing Mormons (following the example of church leaders) often blame those who drop out for simple or petty or even demonic reasons – that’s not my story,” Green explained in his letter. ‘I stopped believing and listening on principle.’

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